Stanleyville – Nightstream review

Stanleyville – Nightstream review
Stanleyville – Nightstream review

Office drone Maria Barbizan leads what looks like a meaningless life. She’s lonely, and she doesn’t really exist, at her job or within her family. One day, she does everything we’ve all dreamed of – she throws her purse and old life in the trash, and joins an enigmatic contest to win... a car. Locked in a room with four strangers, each more eccentric than the next, she must go through a series of challenges – a “competition to probe the very essence of mind-body articulation”, lead by Homunculus, an intriguing and curious host.

What would you do if you were approached by a strange man, to play a contest of sorts, to win an even weirder prize? What would you do if you just threw your hands in the air and said screw it and left your previous life behind the same day? These are the questions that Stanleyville asks, to quite hilarious results. Sometimes we all just need a fresh start, and what better way to get said start than winning a brand new habaerno-orange vehicle?

The film focuses on its main contests consisting of Maria played by Susanne Wuest, Andrew played by Christian Serritiello, Felicie played by Cara Ricketts, Bofill played by George Tchortov, Manny played by Adam Brown, and the game master Homunculus played by Julian Richings. Throughout Stanleyville, every actor gives it their all to bring their own unique take to the characters and shines why their motivated to win this strangely odd prize. It truly works as an absurdist black comedy thanks to the cast being able to emerge themselves will still playing the game in a cunning way.

Stanleyville works with its strange, yet hilarious premise because of the way the film itself is conceived and told and the cast supporting this concept. Everyone has their own motivation, and each character is an obstacle for one another, pushing the limits of their sanity beyond reproach. Stanleyville is a well done black comedy that is sure to please its audience.

7

Good

My earliest movie memory, outside of my home theatre in my basement, was going to the local Video 99 and wanting to rent ET only to be told by the shop owner it was playing down the street in theatres. My love for cinema has been alive for as long as I can honestly remember. I would frequent the cinema minutes down from my house daily. It was a second home. Movies are an escape from the everyday world, a window into the soul, a distant friend. If I’m not watching a movie, I’m probably watching a tv show, if I’m doing neither I’m asleep.

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